Global Green and DevvStream Partner to Launch Inaugural U.S. Carbon Program to Advance Technological Solutions to Climate Change

DevvStream Holdings Inc. (“DevvStream” or the “Company”) (NEO:DESG), a leading carbon credit investment firm specializing in technology solutions, and Global Green, the American affiliate of Green Cross International (GCI), a global non-governmental organization founded by President Mikhail Gorbachev in 1993, are pleased to announce the launch of a U.S. Carbon Program (the “Program”).

The Program is designed to introduce advanced emissions-reducing technologies to Global Green’s extensive network of local and federal government organizations, Fortune 100 companies, academic institutions, and private foundations, while providing funding for sustainability initiatives, programs and projects through the use of carbon offset credits.

Carbon market investments have become a vital component of forward-thinking climate plans for both the public and private sector.

The global voluntary carbon market was valued at ~US $2B, in 2021 and is expected to grow 50x by 2030, while the compliance market grew from $305B in 2020 to $806B in 2021.

Carbon credits created via nature-based solutions (e.g., tree planting, agricultural projects, forestry protection) can only provide up to 20% of carbon emission reductions necessary to meet the world’s goals, while the other 80% will need to come from technology-based solutions (e.g., carbon removal, artificial carbon sequestration, and the replacement of current inefficient technologies).

As such, the Program relies exclusively on the generation of technology-based carbon credits, leveraging DevvStream’s expertise in compliance and voluntary markets, its advanced blockchain-based digital asset platform, and its curated ecosystem of technology partners.

Sunny Trinh, CEO of DevvStream stated:

“Federal and local governments, organizations in the private sector, and educational institutions can now leverage the financial power of global carbon markets as they work with Global Green to achieve their broader sustainability goals,”

“Our partnership with Global Green broadens our reach, while providing our affiliate network with new deployment opportunities for their world-changing technologies.”

CEO of Global Green, William Bridge stated:

“As the CEO of Global Green and the hopes for a brighter and greener future, I am thrilled to announce our partnership with DevvStream—a leading carbon credit investment firm specializing in technology solutions,”

“With the climate crisis at its breaking point and the need for a crucial and profound impact to change the direction in which it’s heading, partnering with DevvStream, who provides upfront capital for organizations such as ours in exchange for carbon credit rights, this couldn’t be more exciting. As a non-profit organization approaching our 30-year anniversary, Global Green are honored to be partnering with a groundbreaking organization like DevvStream, and we look forward to our future collaboration.”

Global Green is the American affiliate of Green Cross International (GCI), an international non- governmental organization founded by President Gorbachev in 1993 to foster a global value shift toward a sustainable and secure future. Green Cross International operates in over 30 countries and enjoys consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council, and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. GCI is an NGO, holding observer status with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Conference of the Parties to the UN Convention to Combat Desertification. It also cooperates directly with the UNEP/OCHA Environmental Emergencies Section, UN-HABITAT and other international organizations.

For nearly 30 years, Global Green has served as a recognized national leader in advancing smart solutions to climate change that improve lives and protect the planet. Programmatically, Global Green works to create green cities, neighborhoods, affordable housing, and schools to protect environmental health, improve livability, create sustainable communities, and support the planet’s natural systems. In service of its mission, Global Green has partnered with over 50 organizations including local and federal governments, Fortune 100 companies, academic institutions, international groups and private foundations. The Program will be an integral component of Global Green’s suite of offerings to its partners.

About Global Green

Global Green is the American affiliate of Green Cross International (GCI), an international non- governmental organization founded by President Gorbachev in 1993.

For nearly 30 years, Global Green has served as a recognized national leader in advancing smart solutions to climate change that improve lives and protect the planet, with the mission to foster a global value shift toward a sustainable and secure future.

Programmatically, Global Green works to create green cities, neighborhoods, affordable housing, and schools to protect environmental health, improve livability, create sustainable communities, and support the planet’s natural systems.

In service of its mission, Global Green has partnered with over 50 organizations including local and federal governments, Fortune 100 companies, academic institutions, international groups and private foundations.

About DevvStream

DevvStream is a technology-based ESG company that advances the development and monetization of environmental assets, with an initial focus on carbon markets.

We work with governments and corporations worldwide to achieve their sustainability goals through the implementation of curated green technology projects that generate renewable energy, improve energy efficiencies, eliminate or reduce emissions, and sequester carbon directly from the air—creating carbon credits in the process.

This enables us to provide non-dilutive capital directly to our clients while empowering them with field-proven, technology-based solutions to improve their climate impact quickly and simply.

To address common issues such as greenwashing and double-counting, all environmental assets created through our projects are managed via a proprietary blockchain-based ESG software platform, designed explicitly to ensure transparency and auditability, with full data provenance, which significantly increases asset value.

DevvStream’s business model includes mutual collaboration and partnership with Devvio, a leading ESG-focused blockchain company, and United Cities North America, an affiliate of the United Nations with a focus on building sustainable and net-zero smart cities and communities.

Click here to Get DevvStream’s Latest Investor Deck

 

Disclosure: Owners, members, directors and employees of carboncredits.com have/may have stock or option position in any of the companies mentioned: DESG

Carboncredits.com receives compensation for this publication and has a business relationship with any company whose stock(s) is/are mentioned in this article

Additional disclosure: This communication serves the sole purpose of adding value to the research process and is for information only. Please do your own due diligence. Every investment in securities mentioned in publications of carboncredits.com involve risks which could lead to a total loss of the invested capital.

Please read our Full RISKS and DISCLOSURE here.

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Lenovo Unveils 2050 Net Zero Goal, Enters Carbon Credits Deal

Lenovo has revealed its goal to reach net zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2050, which the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) approves, and entered a carbon credits deal with K+N. 

With this commitment, Lenovo becomes the first PC and smartphone maker with an SBTi-approved net zero target. The tech firm is also one of only 139 companies in the world that has a climate goal validated by the Net Zero Standard

Lenovo’s emissions reduction measurements will contribute to a wider body of data to better understand and tackle climate change.

The SBTi Net Zero Standard

Lenovo Chairman Yuanqing Yang remarked:

“In the fight against climate change, we believe collaboration and accountability are the two critical elements needed for collective success. We remain dedicated to following climate science, standardizing our measurements, and seeking ongoing validation for our targets and progress.” 

Aligning net zero goals to the SBTi helps Lenovo to take a scientific, collaborative, and accountable means to cut emissions. Without doing so will make it hard to know when a net zero target is met. 

SBTi is the first international body to standardize net zero and what it means as it relates to limiting global warming to 1.5°C. This net zero standard is also dynamic and responsive to firms’ collective efforts to decarbonize. 

More importantly, SBTi holds companies accountable for their emissions reduction targets. 

More than 4,000 companies worldwide are in the process of aligning their emissions reduction goals to SBTi’s methodology and validation processes. 

CEO of the SBTi Luiz Amaral noted that the world needs rapid and deep emissions cuts to meet global net zero targets to avoid the most damaging effects of climate change. He further said:

“Lenovo’s net zero targets match the urgency of the climate crisis and set a clear example that their peers must follow.” 

How Lenovo Will Hit Its 2050 Net Zero Goal

Lenovo commits to reaching net zero emissions across its value chain by 2050. Its long-term target is to cut absolute GHG emissions across all three scopes – 1, 2, and 3 – by 90% by 2050 from a 2019 base year

Hitting such an ambitious decarbonization goal requires the tech company to achieve the following reduction goals.

SBTi-Validated Near-Term Targets

Reduce scope 1 and scope 2 GHG emissions by 50% by 2030, compared to 2019 levels
Reduce emissions from the use of sold products by 35% on average for comparable products by 2030
Cut scope 3 emissions from purchased goods and services by 66.5% per million US$ gross profit by 2030
Cut scope 3 emissions from upstream transportation and distribution by 25% per tonne-km of transported product by 2030

The key strategies that Lenovo will adopt to reduce its GHG emissions are:

Slashing the environmental impact of its products
Applying innovation to increase the sustainability of its manufacturing
Reducing emissions across its operations and value chain

These plans are outlined in Lenovo’s Journey to Net-Zero video series. It shows how the company’s experts are modifying business processes to hit net zero targets. 

In addition to those emission reduction strategies, Lenovo is also working with other firms to further cut its carbon footprint. Its recent carbon credits collaboration with Kuehne+Nagel (K+N) perfectly shows this. 

Lenovo and K+N Carbon Credits Deal

Lenovo works with Kuehne+Nagel to develop a green logistics service that allows its customers to buy carbon credits that fund the use of Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF).

SAF is a fuel from sustainable inputs that reduces carbon emissions.

Via a purchase add-on service, customers can buy credits to cut the footprint of shipping the IT equipment and devices they purchase. They can then use those credits to fund the use of SAF that K+N provides.

There’s a specific amount of liters of SAF assigned to a purchased device. That figure equals the amount of reduction that the customer can claim under Scope 3.1. – emissions for purchased goods and services. 

If this service is chosen, Kuehne+Nagel will issue the carbon credit or certificate to Lenovo and its customers. This certificate indicates the amount of SAF liters per purchased device for any logistics company.

Through K+N’s SAF concept, Lenovo finds a way to address carbon emissions across supply chains, which is in line with its SBTi targets. This further allows Lenovo customers to avoid emissions in product shipment regardless of the lane or airline. 

This forged carbon credit deal with K+N enables Lenovo to pursue its net zero commitment – by “delivering sustainable products and solutions”, the head of global logistics at Lenovo, Gareth Davies said.

Lenovo is an early adopter of the science-based emissions reduction approach. It has received SBTi approval for its near-term 2030 goals in 2020. This has allowed the firm to road-test the first-of-its-kind Net Zero Standard. 

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DevvStream Files Provisional Patents to Improve Efficiencies in Carbon Credit Generation

DevvStream Holdings Inc. (“DevvStream” or the “Company”) (NEO:DESG), a leading carbon credit investment firm specializing in technology solutions, today announced the filing of provisional patent applications surrounding its innovative programmatic approach to green project management and carbon credit generation.

These initial filings establish concrete definitions for, and stake boundaries around, the Company’s exclusive processes and methodologies.

The provisional patents are primarily focused on the establishment of a proprietary umbrella approach to program implementation across the scope of the Company’s operations.

This umbrella approach will allow the Company to aggregate multiple green technology projects together under a single designated program, resulting in several anticipated efficiency improvements.

Implementation costs are expected to be reduced, current barriers to participation are expected to be eliminated, and the process for generating carbon credits is expected to accelerate.

Sunny Trinh, CEO of DevvStream stated:

“The current rate of greenhouse gas emissions underscores the importance of creating carbon credit programs that are robust and far-reaching, yet nimble and efficiently operated,” 

“By combining relevant green technology projects under the auspices of a common program, we can, for example, plug and seal a greater number of leaky wellbores more quickly under our methane abatement programs, including oil wells that might otherwise fail to qualify due to size or location. We anticipate that our proprietary approach will broaden our client reach, and by extension, broaden our overall environmental impact as a company.”

Click here to Get DevvStream’s Latest Investor Deck

 

Disclosure: Owners, members, directors and employees of carboncredits.com have/may have stock or option position in any of the companies mentioned: DESG

Carboncredits.com receives compensation for this publication and has a business relationship with any company whose stock(s) is/are mentioned in this article

Additional disclosure: This communication serves the sole purpose of adding value to the research process and is for information only. Please do your own due diligence. Every investment in securities mentioned in publications of carboncredits.com involve risks which could lead to a total loss of the invested capital.

Please read our Full RISKS and DISCLOSURE here.

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DevvStream (DESG) Goes Public

Don’t be misled by the low carbon prices on our dashboard over the last few months…

Carbon has drawn a LOT of capital over the last 18 months.

Recently one of the largest carbon exchangesXpansiv – announced a major investment from Blackstone Group. To the tune of $400 million. They also raised an additional $125M with participation from Bank of America and Goldman Sachs.

What Xpansiv does is closely watched by a tight-knit industry group. Because the majority of voluntary carbon market credits go through their platform.

They see what’s moving, how and at what price. 

Which is why a lot of companies want to team up with them and get on their rolodex, fast.

So, when the Executive Chairman of Xpansiv (still a private company) becomes a shareholder and Director of a small, private carbon company…

You want to pay attention!

DevvStream (DESG:NEO) is NOW LIVE

DevvStream (DESG: NEO) is one of the best ways to capitalize on two of the hottest sectors of the moment…

Blockchain Technology and Carbon.

If these sound like two completely different things, don’t worry. 

One’s a global market estimated to be worth $5.92 billion already…
And the other is already over $820B in 2021 and forecasted to be worth $1.9 trillion by 2040.

Combine them and you have something that could be very interesting.

People are taking notice of the carbon markets, including big-time investors like Google, HSBC and Meta.

The company we’re talking about, DevvStream, runs on a solid business model that has delivered 10x returns in other sectors, such as precious metals mining…

DevvStream (DESG:NEO) has an incredible business model that follows in the footsteps of the early days of many successful precious metal royalty and streaming companies. 

These companies grew to an 8, 9, and 10-figure market cap over the years.

We have been following the story for over a year now, and when we met with the company in early January and couldn’t believe the progress they had made since our last update. 

The company achieved revenue in the 3rd quarter of 2022
They have 9 signed LOIs & Termsheets and 3 contracts already with 4 more in the works.
It intends to retain 90-100% of the carbon credits generated by DevvStream investments. 
Target paybacks of 2 years for each investment project with a 10+ year stream

The IRR numbers they’ve published are truly eye-popping for some of their projects. Take a look at their near-term pipeline…

DevvStream Tech-Based Projects

DESG is not your typical nature play or decarbonization stock.

They’re attracting partners in the massive technology and energy sectors.

Project Profile: LED Retrofit

DevvStream has an opportunity to replace old and inefficient 100W light bulbs with 7W LED bulbs in Sub-Sahara Africa.

It costs $900,000 for 100k bulbs, and they’re eyeing a project term of 10 years. All told this could deliver 30,000 carbon credits yearly for Devvstream, per container. With multiple countries in Africa wanting to participate, there is a big demand for these LED bulbs.

At the prices the company believes it can sell, they forecast an IR of 60-90% on this deal.

Project Profile: Plugging Abandoned and Orphaned Oil Wells in North America

It’s no secret that environmentalists hate oil wells. And legions of groups spend big money to stop them.

So DevvStream is going to help oil companies and environmentalists at the same time, by plugging abandoned oil wells.

There is an opportunity to eliminate methane leakage from abandoned oil wells. Methane, if you don’t know, is terrible for emissions.

Some estimates have it as 32x more potent at trapping heat than CO2 when it comes to gas in the atmosphere. This means that every ton of avoided methane can generate 32 carbon credits.

So, how many oil wells are in this shape, you ask? 

There are about 4 million abandoned and orphaned oil wells in the USA alone. And a further 370,000 in Canada.

But get this, 96% of leakage comes from about 10% of the wells. The top 10% could generate 2,000 credits per year or more.

DevvStream has invested US$1.25M into a company with an advanced and patented nanopolymer sealant that is 10x more effective at plugging wells than current solutions. This investment gives DevvStream worldwide exclusivity and pays for the first 24 wells.

And this is no science project, three pilot wells have already been successfully plugged with this new technology. The company is also in talks with an oil and gas company to get access to approximately 800 abandoned oil wells.

All told, this project could bring in 125,000 carbon credits per year just from the first initial set of wells. And the first credits could come in 2023.

But Wait, There’s More…

This is only 2 of the main projects DevvStream has running.

One of their emissions reduction projects involves improving road construction technologies and methods. Sounds archaic. 

But guess what, road construction and maintenance is something that every city needs, and DevvStream is already talking to several cities.

As a result, DevvStream estimates the credits generated to be up to 5 million carbon credits every year… for 20 years.

And this is an inherent advantage of most of DevvStream’s technology-based projects. Once proven, they can be replicated over and over again.

DevvStream’s pipeline of projects is spread around the globe, reducing geopolitical risk and regulations from any 1 area. Much like a standard investment portfolio in different sectors.

This is a high-risk, high-reward, high-margin business model ready to leverage and scale with the incredible growth trajectory of the voluntary and compliance carbon market.

DevvStream is now publicly trading – and we imagine things will start happening quickly in 2023. 

We’re following the story, and we’ll bring you all the important developments.

Click here to Get their Investor Deck

 

Disclosure: Owners, members, directors and employees of carboncredits.com have/may have stock or option position in any of the companies mentioned: DESG

Carboncredits.com receives compensation for this publication and has a business relationship with any company whose stock(s) is/are mentioned in this article

Additional disclosure: This communication serves the sole purpose of adding value to the research process and is for information only. Please do your own due diligence. Every investment in securities mentioned in publications of carboncredits.com involve risks which could lead to a total loss of the invested capital.

Please read our Full RISKS and DISCLOSURE here.

The post DevvStream (DESG) Goes Public appeared first on Carbon Credits.

Temasek Funds Biotech Firm Living Carbon for GMO Super Trees

Temasek, Singapore’s sovereign wealth fund, along with Toyota, led the $21 million Series A funding round for climate biotech company Living Carbon that seeks to improve the ability of trees to absorb carbon.

Living Carbon is a public benefit company aiming to balance the earth’s carbon cycle using plants, particularly photosynthesis-enhanced trees. It engineers super trees that grow much faster and sequesters more CO2 than regular trees.

Founded in 2019, the climate tech company said its first product, a hybrid poplar tree, can capture up to 27% more carbon. Maddie Hall, CEO and Co-Founder of Living Carbon said: 

“We’re excited to close our Series A and continue to make progress on large scale carbon removal using plant biotechnology…Photosynthesis enhancement increases biomass rather than yield so is better suited to carbon markets, where success is measured by how much carbon is locked away…”

Living Carbon $21M Series A Round

The San Francisco-based firm has raised $21M in a Series A funding round led by Temasek and backed by largest automaker Toyota. The round also has participation from Lowercarbon Capital, Felicis Ventures, and other strategic angels. This makes the total funding raised to $36 million

The biotech firm said it will use the money to grow its team and expand its work on bio-engineered climate solutions. It will also spend the funds to produce up to 5 million super trees saplings and fund research of new products. And that’s despite criticism over possible unintended consequences of genetically tweaking trees.

Non-profit campaigners like “The Campaign to Stop Genetically Modified Trees” oppose the idea. They said in a report that doing so may have an impact with “unpredictable, uncontrollable and irreversible nature”. Tree pollen and seeds cannot be contained.

But earlier this year, Living Carbon released a paper showing the huge potential of biotechnology in helping stabilize the climate. 

Living Carbon Biotech: Photosynthesis Enhancement 

The carbon sucking abilities of trees are critical to the world’s efforts to limit global warming. But the rate of deforestation continues to increase, hitting record high in the Amazon last year.

There are many ways to enhance carbon capture in plants. These include increasing resistance to disease and drought, salt tolerance, decomposition resistance, and photosynthesis enhancement.

While most efforts focus on protecting forests or regrowing them, Living Carbon is tweaking the genetic code of trees so that they grow quicker while locking away more CO2. 

Photosynthesis-Enhanced Sapling

Left: hybrid poplar seedling with photosynthesis enhancement trait. Right: control hybrid poplar seedling. Source: Living Carbon

As shown in the image above, a photosynthesis-enhanced seedling (left) is taller than its controlled counterpart (right). 

The firm’s initial focus is two-fold:

Improve carbon capture in trees via more efficient photosynthesis
Improve carbon storage through decay-resistant wood, slowing the release of carbon through decomposition

Boosting Carbon Capture in Engineered Super Trees

The biotech firm’s research shows that enhancing photosynthesis can boost biomass accumulation in trees by 53% more than control plants. 

Biomass accumulation is a strong indicator of carbon assimilation, with about half of biomass being stored carbon. 

As shown below, event A (hybrid poplar in green bar) has significantly higher biomass production in all plant tissue types, at both fresh weight and dry weight levels. 

Biomass Production in Hybrid Poplar Vs. Controlled Plants

The study also revealed, in a world first, the potential to capture about 27% more carbon.

More biomass and faster growth means more carbon capture.

Living Carbon’s biotechnology is an example of how engineering can work together with nature’s ability to capture and store carbon. The company’s use of biotech in trees shows how this can be a scalable and viable solution to the climate crisis.

The biotech firm’s photosynthesis-enhanced trees offer opportunities for nature-based carbon removal. By planting these trees and locking away more carbon, landowners can generate carbon credits that they can sell to entities seeking to offset their CO2 footprint.

Lisa Coca, Climate Fund Partner at Toyota Ventures, commented: 

“The voluntary carbon credit market is on track to exceed $50 billion by 2030… Living Carbon’s synthetic biology platform has the potential to fill the gap between supply and demand by leveraging the powerful combination of proven nature-based solutions as a carbon sink and genetic engineering to deliver high-quality carbon credits to the market.”

Living Carbon is ramping up production of its biotech hybrid trees. It’s on track to produce 4-5 million seedlings throughout the U.S. in 2023-2024. The seedlings will be available for companies to buy to reduce their emissions.

The firm is partnering with landowners to develop carbon projects in Pennsylvania and Georgia. With a focus on the U.S. market first, they aim to double annual acreage. 

Living Carbon will plant 60,000 seedlings in February and has sold out the carbon credits for them for 2023. But they’re also doing pre-sales for the next two years. 

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DESG.NE

DESG.NE Stock Predictions, Articles, and News

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IMPT to Buy $54M Carbon Credits From Polygon-Powered Thallo

IMPT closed a deal to buy carbon credits worth US$54 (€50) from Polygon blockchain-based marketplace Thallo.  

IMPT is a global carbon-offsetting ecosystem that connects brands to individuals and businesses looking to cut their carbon footprint. Thallo uses blockchain technology to make it easier for buyers and sellers of carbon credits to find each other.

The deal will see IMPT buying carbon credits from Thallo with an estimated value of US$54 (€50) over 10 years. 

IMPT Sourcing Tokenized Carbon Credits from Thallo

Using the current market carbon prices, the carbon credit deal will help offset around 12 million tonnes of carbon over ten years. It’s equal to the annual CO2 footprint of about 2.6 million people. 

This partnership is a major milestone in developing the IMPT platform that will allow community members to convert their native tokens into carbon credits

Remarking on the agreement, IMPT CEO Denis Creighton said:

“We are thrilled to partner with Thallo to source high-quality tokenized carbon credits for our protocol…Putting these credits into the hands of our community is the next step in realising our vision of building a global network of people who want to play their part in combating climate change by taking small actions in their everyday lives.”

The agreement involves an initial 3-year purchase of €3.6 million worth of carbon credits. Then there’s a Memorandum of Understanding for a long-term partnership over 10 years. 

IMPT will purchase carbon credits from Thallo’s diverse portfolio of project developers. These include both carbon removal and avoidance projects from 5 different continents. Each project helps reduce carbon emissions to fight climate change. 

In a report last year, Thallo combined carbon project developer insights to identify challenges to scaling the voluntary carbon market. These include, in particular, verification delays that can bring 2.6 billion in losses to developers. 

Bridging Unretired Credits Using Blockchain

The live, unretired credits will be bridged onto the Polygon blockchain via Thallo’s 2-way bridge from existing carbon registries. These include the Colombian BioCarbon Registry. 

Thallo’s Two-Way Carbon Bridge allows companies and individuals to move carbon credits on and off the blockchain. This is crucial to avoid double accounting and preserve the integrity of the carbon credit.

This blockchain technology enables easy buying, selling, and retiring credits while ensuring transparency and traceability.

Information about the project, vintage, serial numbers, etc. are stored on-chain in the Thallo Bridge. This enables anyone to access this data at any time due to the public and distributed nature of the blockchain. And that’s even if the registry system is not available.

The end goal of the bridge is to be a public, transparent ledger of all events related to the issuance and retirement of tokenized carbon credits.

Thallo’s Two-Way Carbon Bridge Process

The deal with IMPT is the first use of Thallo’s ‘Bridging-as-a-Service’ product offer. It allows Web3 companies to integrate carbon credits directly into their own infrastructure. It also helps Web2 companies by allowing e-commerce customers to offset the emissions of their purchases.

Thallo Co-Founder and CEO, Ryan Gledhill said:

“Thallo’s ground-breaking infrastructure enables voluntary carbon market innovators to access an ever-increasing number of registries with a simple integration model…The market is one of the world’s most impactful tools to combat climate change.”

He added that IMPT’s innovative model will continue to scale alongside Thallo as they attract more suppliers in 2023 and beyond.

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Sustainable Forestry A Net Carbon Source?

A new study shows that logged and degraded tropical forests are a net source of carbon emissions for at least 10 years, meaning the carbon they emit is more than what they absorb.

New young trees taking the place of logged ones for timber are thought to suck in more CO2 than what’s lost in logging. But that’s not always the case, according to new research. 

One author said carbon sequestration is outweighed by the high emissions from soil organic matter and decaying wood. Thus, it’s a disbelief that logged forests continue to take in more carbon than they put out.

An expert informed about the study noted:

“The newly sequestered carbon will not be equitable to the original carbon sink and could not compensate for carbon losses due to logging. On the other hand, logging could increase heterotrophic activities such as decomposition and soil degradation, worsening the carbon balance in a forest ecosystem.”

The recent paper is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It was part of the Imperial College London’s Stability of Altered Forest Ecosystem (SAFE) project.

Forests: No Longer Carbon Sinks?

Land sequesters about 30% of global GHG emissions, making it a great carbon sink. And tropical forests are an important component of that carbon sink. 

The world’s largest tropical rainforest, the Amazon, stores a large amount of carbon and houses at least 10% of the world’s biodiversity.

Tropical forests are a critical element of the global carbon budget. It refers to the highest level of global net emissions allowed to limit global warming to a certain level. 

According to an older paper, tropical forests sequestered 15% of all CO2 emitted by humans between 1990 and 2007. But the new study finds that the carbon sequestering abilities of tropical forests are declining. 

A previous study also showed that tropical forests are no longer carbon sinks because of deforestation and land degradation. 

In the case of the forests in Malaysian Borneo (the study site), the researchers examined both intact and degraded forest plots to measure the CO2 emissions and sequestration. This forested area faces heavy degradation and deforestation

A degraded forest hasn’t been fully cleared but is heavily affected by logging. On the other hand, deforestation refers to the clearing of a forest. 

The team compared the net carbon exchange of a logged forest area with nearby unlogged areas. Using two different methods, the authors concluded that the logged forests are net carbon sources for at least a decade as they recover. 

By calculating plant growth and respiration rates, the scientists found that the cleared area was a carbon source on 99% of the 455 studied days. 

Overestimated Carbon Sequestration? 

Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange at Logged & Unlogged Sites

The chart above shows the average net ecosystem CO2 exchange at six unlogged and logged sites. It’s measured as millions of grams of carbon per hectare per year.

A positive value indicates a net source of carbon emissions. 

Overall, it says that heavily logged plots (in brown hatched) are a bigger CO2 source than the more moderately logged (in brown striped) and unlogged sites (in green). 

The brown bars show the net emissions from logged areas. While the green bar stresses that intact, old-growth forests are carbon sinks.

Logged Forests as Net Carbon Source

The authors point out that previous research focused on how much CO2 new trees store. But generally, they didn’t consider the overall carbon budget. They fail to account for significant carbon sources such as dead wood and soil. 

On the contrary, the new paper found that a major source of CO2 emissions in logged forests is decaying or rotting parts of a tree. They’re damaged during the logging process. 

The new findings mean that the carbon sequestration rates of recovering tropical forests may be lower than estimated. In other words, there may be an overestimation. Dr. Terhi Riutta, the lead author remarked:

“That’s how logging has often been justified: that you are replacing something that is old, that is not growing very much, by something younger that is growing very fast. But it’s not the whole truth at all.”

If true, this poses a serious concern because “logged tropical forests are counted as important carbon sinks in global carbon budgets due to the woody biomass they regain when they regrow after disturbance”. 

The research concludes that their studied area and data broadly represent the wider logged tropical forest ecosystems. 

Other experts on the matter said that the findings could help improve estimates of carbon emissions from forest degradation. If so, it can aid in mitigating and avoiding emissions from logged forests.

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Is Offsetting Carbon Worth It?

Is offsetting carbon worth it? This question has never been more controversial right now and it deserves a good answer, especially if you’re into carbon offset credits.

If you shop online, take flights, or use ride-hailing apps like Uber, you’ve likely noticed the option of including carbon offsetting when making your purchases. Many companies allow consumers to voluntarily offset the carbon emissions of their rides, flights, or product deliveries by paying for them out of their own products.

But is there an incentive for companies to offset carbon emissions themselves?

Through initiatives like carbon credits, companies can invest in emission reduction projects that will help them move towards carbon neutrality.

So, does offsetting carbon worth it? Do carbon offsetting projects actually do what they say they will? And what else can companies gain by offsetting their carbon emissions?

Before we give you all the answers, let’s get back to basics first by explaining what carbon offsetting is all about.

What is Carbon Offsetting?

Each person on this planet has a carbon footprint, but the size of that footprint is dependent on the actions we take on a daily basis. A carbon footprint is the total amount of greenhouse gases generated by an entity, such as a person, company, event, or place.

The most powerful greenhouse gases are carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. But carbon dioxide is the most significant contributor to climate change. That’s not because carbon dioxide is more destructive than the others, but because it’s the most common gas generated by human activity. 

That is why there has been a bigger push and focus on carbon offsetting. It’s true that individual activities like daily transportation, diet, and household energy consumption have a part to play. Yet, the largest contributors of carbon dioxide are companies.

In fact, according to The Carbon Majors Database (published by the Carbon Disclosure Project), 71% of the world’s industrial emissions over the last 50 years were produced by just 100 companies. That doesn’t mean individual decisions don’t still have tremendous power, but it’s especially important for companies to consider offsetting carbon.

Carbon offsetting provides gives individuals and companies with an accessible means of offsetting their emissions. One way is by investing in carbon reduction projects such as tree planting initiatives. 

Companies can seek out specific environmental projects like this on their own and partner with them or buy carbon credits from a carbon credits broker, who will invest in offsetting programs on your behalf. If you have a specific cause you’re particularly passionate about, you can channel your carbon-offsetting investment directly to that.

Now that we’ve covered what carbon offsetting is, let’s look at whether carbon offsetting is worth it. What are the benefits?

Carbon Offsets Help Reduce Climate Emissions

We are all aware that the global temperature is rising, along with sea levels. The evidence for climate change cannot be argued, and human emissions have the biggest impact, contributing to 90% of all carbon dioxide emissions. Most people go about their daily business without giving climate emissions much thought.

But what if they cost money?

We bet that people would think twice about their actions if they had to pay for the carbon they emit. Carbon offsetting programs like carbon credits help reduce climate emissions by putting a price tag on emissions, encouraging corporations and companies to implement emission reduction initiatives (or pay the price!).

And while carbon offsetting is still, for the most part, voluntary, there is a global push to reduce emissions. And with that push will come more regulations.

Depending on the regulatory efforts of countries, research from BloombergNEF estimates the cost of carbon offsets could increase by up to 3000% by 2029.

If that isn’t a reason for companies to get the jump on emission reduction efforts, then what is?

Carbon Offsetting Channels Funds to Conservation and Sustainable Development

Carbon offsetting enables companies to tap into and support some incredible conservation and sustainable development projects that positively impact our planet.

Companies can choose projects that align with their values and have the most significant carbon reduction impact. As the number of carbon offsetting and carbon credit programs continues to grow exponentially, their creditability is of utmost importance.

For those wanting to work directly with carbon offsetting organizations, ensure they are accredited by a third party, such as the International Carbon and Offset Alliance (ICROA), American Carbon Registry, and Climate Action Reserve.

Some examples of projects that offset carbon include waste to energy, reforestation, renewable energy (wind, hydro, solar), kelp forests, or avoided emissions projects.

Boosts Company Reputation

Identifying as a carbon-neutral company can boost your reputation as a positive, environmentally friendly, and purpose-oriented corporation.

Reputation is essential for the success of any company or business.

Companies should all adopt CSR (corporate social responsibility), which shows consumers that they operate transparently. And with increased global awareness around sustainability and climate change, consumers expect companies to operate sustainably and responsibly.

By doing so, and being transparent about carbon offsetting practices, you can expect a nice reputation boost! And this reputation boost makes your company more likely to attract the attention of potential consumers and media outlets. That leads us to the next benefit.

Gives Companies a Competitive Edge/Advantage

As previously mentioned, companies operating sustainably is no longer just an added bonus; it’s an expectation. So, are you implementing carbon reduction practices, or at the very least investing in carbon offsetting? If not, then you will soon fall behind any competitors who do.

Consumers who have the choice between a carbon-neutral company and one that is not will inevitably choose the more eco-conscious company. A recent study from SmartestEnergy revealed that 4 of 5 people would choose companies with sustainable environmental practices over those without.

To keep a competitive edge, companies will NEED to participate in carbon offsetting. And that’s regardless if it’s on a voluntary basis or not.

Is Carbon Offsetting Sustainable Long-term?

Some are concerned that carbon offsetting is not an effective long-term solution to climate change. And they may be right.

But the true goal of carbon offsetting isn’t to be the only solution for all of time. What carbon offsetting provides a reinforced company commitment to sustainability and sustainable practices.

Even with companies making no changes to their operations, they’re still investing in projects that will improve how the world operates. But inevitably, companies will be forced into operating more efficiently and reducing their carbon emissions because of carbon offsetting.

The price for carbon offset credits will continue to rise, and while they may be mostly voluntary at this point, it won’t be long before it’s legally mandated.

There are already many mandatory international and regional carbon reduction schemes, such as the California Carbon Market and the Emissions Trading System (ETS) in Europe. And we will see more of them in the coming years. Because of this, companies will be accountable to strive for emission reduction before buying carbon offsets becomes a mandate.

Are Carbon Offsets a Tool for Greenwashing?

Another common misconception about carbon offsetting is that it has the potential to be a tool for greenwashing. 

The ability to offset carbon emissions enables companies to claim they are carbon neutral without actually having to update their processes to reduce operational carbon emissions. And this could mislead consumers to believe that carbon offsetting is not worth it.

While that concern is valid, the reality is that few companies will fork out the money for carbon offsets or carbon credits if they have no concern for the planet or their impact. Most companies use carbon offsetting as a tool for positive change. And that’s while they work on implementing new and more efficient practices.

For firms that invest in carbon offsetting without any intention to make operational changes, they will continue to pay a higher premium for their choices. And that money will go directly into world-changing projects.

How Can You Choose the Best Carbon Offsetting Solution?

Choosing the best carbon offsetting solution can be challenging. Voluntary programs are regulated mainly by private entities (with some not regulated at all).

Can we actually trust private entities like Verified Carbon Standard and Climate Action Reserve to connect us with legitimate programs and missions?

For now, it’s the best we have. But as carbon offsetting continues to become legally mandated, we expect that government entities will be the ones to regulate them. 

In the meantime, initiatives like The Voluntary Carbon Markets Integrity Initiative have developed a Claims Code of Practice. This initiative is to improve the integrity of carbon offsetting programs, verify climate claims and provide guidance to companies wanting to buy carbon credits.

Initiatives like this can benefit companies that are new to the carbon offsetting game. But your own research will be a key asset in the hunt for a program that aligns most with your offsetting needs.

There are carbon offsetting programs that are:

Crypto-based
Nature-based
Technology-based
Energy and transportation-based

All these sectors require support and have impactful and reputable carbon-offsetting initiatives worth investing in.

So, Is Carbon Offsetting Worth It?

The only way to be carbon neutral is through carbon offsetting. It’s not possible to produce zero carbon. So carbon offsetting is the best way to decrease our actions’ negative impact on the environment.

Emissions reduction should always be at the core of everything we do as individuals and as companies. But carbon offsetting will always be worth it and can take us to carbon neutrality that we all should be striving for.

If you’re unsure where to begin your carbon offsetting journey, purchasing carbon credits is always a good place to start. These credits are then invested into verified and thoroughly researched carbon offsetting programs.

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